About Us

about vision icon

To be the leader in voice, information, and entertainment solutions in Mid-Huron.

about vision icon

To be your local provider to talk, connect, watch, and play.

Board of Directors

ian matthew

Chairperson-Bluewater

Ian Matthew, CPA, CA is a locally owned and operated tax and accounting practice.  Ian Matthew has been operating a public practice initially in Kitchener Waterloo and for the past 25 years in Bayfield, Ontario. The focus of the practice is small business and tax compliance. 
As an entrepreneur, Ian Matthew has been involved in ownership and management of several business entities including international trucking, a chain of retail stores and a direct sale cosmetic company.  He also taught for 20 years as a full time professor at Conestoga College.
Always involved in community groups Ian is currently a director of Tuckersmith Communications Cooperative Ltd ., Bayfield & Area Chamber of Commerce and an owner representative with Libro Credit Union.   
Our client’s success is our aim.

brandon coleman

Vice Chairperson-Bluewater

Brandon Coleman is the owner of a local agricultural business and is well aware of how important strong, reliable telecommunication services are to the rural/ag community. Brandon has served on the Tuckersmith board for 3 years now and currently the Vice Chair. Brandon provides to the board and will help guide the company into the future with his youthfulness and understanding of the tech industry as a whole.

paul middegaal

Director-Central/North Huron

Paul Middegaal, the newest member of the TCC board, is a lifelong Huron County resident, married for 35 years with two grown daughters. Paul recently retired from Hydro One after 35 years as a regional line maintainer. Also a cash crop farmer since his early teens, he too know the impact technology has had on the farming industry through the years. During his career with Hydro One, Paul sat on numerous committees and was president/chair of the local snowmobile club for many years. These experiences have built my excitement and willingness to run for a director position with Tuckersmith Communications Cooperative and is eager to learn more about TCC in the coming months & years ahead.

jack maclauchlan

Director-Huron East/West Perth

Jack was born and raised in Tuckersmith Township where he began his career with TD bank. He later earned his CGA designation and was employed by the Municipality of Bracebridge before returning to his roots in 1977 to work as clerk treasurer of the township. In 2001 Jack accepted the position of Chief Administrator Officer for the newly formed municipality of Huron East until his retirement in 2010. Jack has been on the TCC Board of Directors for the past eight and a half years and is proud of all the achievements and growth of the company.

chris cardno

Director-Huron East/West Perth

Chris Cardno, has proudly served as a Director with TCC, since 2016 and resides with his family in Egmondville. A diverse employment background in the financial sector, spanning Commercial Banking, Insurance and Real Estate. Chris, held various management level positions by way of his banking career, including finance, credit and customer service positions.

bill meyer

Director-Central/North Huron

Bill and his family have lived in Clinton for over 30 years. He has been a part of the business community owning 2 business in that time.
Bill has always been active in his community. He has volunteered in the Kinsmen club, sat on the fundraising committee for the Clinton Community Centre, chaired Pluckinfest, Santa Claus parade and he has been a coach for minor sports.
Bill has sat on the TCC board since 2017. He is proud that the Tuckersmith Communications gives back to the community he is part of.

Careers at Tuckersmith Communications

Tuckersmith Communications welcomes and encourages applications from people with disabilities. Accommodations are available on request for candidates taking part in all aspects of the selection process.

Respecting and Protecting Our Customers’ Privacy


Your privacy is important to us. Tuckersmith Communications respects and protects the privacy of our customers. We carefully ensure the confidentially of each customer?s account information.

The Privacy Policy specifically complies with the federal Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), which took effect on January 1, 2001.

 

The Scope Of The Privacy Policy


The Privacy Policy addresses the privacy of Tuckersmith Communications retail customers and visitors to Tuckersmith Communications web sites in Canada. It identifies the type of data and information Tuckersmith Communications collects, how we use it and the steps taken to protect your privacy.

 

Personal Information


Personal information is information about an identifiable individual. This includes information about your product and service subscriptions and usage. Publicly available information, such as public directory listing of your name, address, telephone number, electronic address, is not considered to be personal information.

 

Collecting Information Helps Us Serve You Better


Tuckersmith Communications collects personal information only for the following purposes:

  • to establish and maintain responsible commercial relations with you and provide you with ongoing service;
  • to understand your needs and eligibility for products & services;
  • to recommend particular products & services to meet your needs;
  • to develop, enhance, market or provide products and services;
  • to manage and develop Tuckersmith?s business and operations, including personnel and employment matters; and
  • to meet legal and regulatory requirements.

Your personal information will not be used for any other purpose without your consent.

 

Other Parties With Whom We May Share Personal Information


While our general policy is not to provide personal information to any party outside of Tuckersmith Communications, there are certain limited circumstances, outlined below, in which it is necessary to do so. When we do provide personal information to third parties, we provide only that information that is required in the circumstances. Information provided to third parties is used only for the purpose stipulated and is subject to strict terms of confidentiality. Employees of the companies to whom we may provide information must adhere to our privacy standards. Third parties include:

An agent acting on behalf of Tuckersmith, such as a company hired to perform billing, installation or maintenance on our behalf;

Another telecommunications service provider, in order to offer efficient and cost effective provision of telecommunications services;

An agent used by Tuckersmith to evaluate the customer’s credit worthiness or to collect the customer’s account;

Law enforcement agencies, in emergencies, for internal security matters, or where required by court order or search warrant; and

Emergency services, in emergency situations.

 

Commitment To Privacy


We take all of the necessary precautions to ensure the safeguarding of your information, whether it is stored electronically or in paper format. In all cases, information is retained in secure facilities, protected from unauthorized access and kept only as long as is reasonably required. For example, our electronic files are backed up for redundancy, password protected and accessible only by authorized employees, on a need-to-know basis.

 

Use Of ?Cookies?


Some of Tuckersmith Communications Web sites may use ?cookies? to improve our level of service and speed up the delivery of information to our visitors. Cookies are lines of text that are transmitted to your Web browser when you click on a site. They provide a way for a server to recall a previous request or previous registration, or to keep track of a transaction as it progresses, so that information does not have to be repeated. Your browser stores the information on your hard drive and when you return to that site later, the cookie is transmitted back only to the servers that originally sent it to you. You will find that most major web sites use cookies and most major browsers are set up to accept them. If you wish, you can reset your browser either to notify you when you have received a cookie, or to refuse to accept cookies. You do not need cookies to visit our sites.

 

Questions or Concerns


If you have questions or concerns about your privacy, you can contact us at the business office at (519) 263-2211. Our customer service representatives will assist you in resolving the situation. If you still have unresolved concerns with respect to the treatment of your personal information, you may address these concerns, in writing, to the following:

Tuckersmith Communications Co-operative Limited
c/o General Manager
Kippen, Ontario N0M 2E0.

Consumer Bill of Rights

Note: Printable version can be downloaded here.

Information about your local home telephone services

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (the CRTC), the federal body responsible for regulating your telephone service, offers you this guide to help you to understand your rights with respect to local home phone services regulated by the CRTC. One of the CRTC’s goals is for everyone in Canada to have access to reliable and affordable local telephone service. Your local phone service includes basic phone service and other optional local services you subscribe to (for example call answer, call waiting and call display).

The information contained in this guide does not necessarily apply to cellular phone service, voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) service, or local phone service offered by a competitive service provider.

Read on to find out more about:

  • Your right to local telephone service
  • Your right to choose a phone company
  • Your rights regarding deposits for service
  • Your rights when the phone company wants to cut off your phone service
  • Your rights when you want to discontinue your phone service
  • Your right to block outgoing long distance and 900 and 976 calls
  • Your additional rights if you are a person with a disability
  • Your right to keep your information confidential
  • Your rights regarding unsolicited telephone calls
  • Your right to protect your privacy when calling or being called
  • Your right to control access to your home
  • Your rights regarding the wiring and equipment inside your home
  • Your right to refunds
  • Your right to detailed monthly billing information
  • Your right to register a dispute or complaint
  • Your right to participate in CRTC proceedings

You will find more complete information about your relationship with the phone company in the “Terms of Service” section in the front of your telephone directory (the white pages). You may also consult your phone company, its website, or the CRTC to obtain further information about your rights. Contact details for the phone company are included in your telephone directory and your phone bill. Contact details for the CRTC can be found at the end of this guide.

You also have other rights that apply to your telephone service and that do not fall under the CRTC’s mandate. These other rights include, for example, those provided by the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act , under the jurisdiction of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, or equivalent provincial legislation.

Your right to local telephone service

Everyone in Canada has the right to receive basic local home telephone services, subject to certain conditions.

You have the right to receive the following basic services as part of your local telephone service, where they are available:

  • local calling;
  • access to emergency services, for example through 9-1-1;
  • access to the operator and directory assistance;
  • access to long distance calling;
  • touch-tone dialing;
  • access to special features, such as call display blocking;
  • access to message relay service, which is used to facilitate communications with persons with speech or hearing disabilities;
  • a copy of the white and yellow pages of the local phone directory.

These services may not be available in all parts of the country but, where they are available, the phone company must provide them.

When there is phone service in your area and you have the required credit rating or credit guarantees, or if you are required to pay a deposit (see “Your rights regarding deposits” section), the phone company must provide local telephone service to your home. There may be instances where the phone company requires access to your property in order to provide phone service to you.

You are entitled to pay the initial connection charges over a period of up to six months for local telephone service.

In areas where there is no telephone service, there may be options to make phone service available, if you agree to pay certain construction charges. If local telephone service is currently unavailable in your area, contact a phone company providing service in the nearest area and ask them to quote you a price for providing phone service to your home. You are entitled to pay any construction charges on a reasonable instalment basis.

Your right to choose a phone company

When more than one phone company offers service in your area, you can choose from whom to buy phone services, you can switch phone companies or you may be able to buy some services from one phone company and other services from another.

You have a right to choose your phone company and to choose the services that you receive from the phone company. You do not have to buy all of your services from the same phone company. For example, some customers buy their local telephone service from one company and their long distance service from another.

You have the right to change companies where more than one phone company offers service in your area. You can also change the services you are buying from any company (see “Your rights when you want to discontinue phone service” section).

In most circumstances, you will be able to keep your phone number when you change phone companies, providing that you stay within the same local telephone service area. When switching to a new telephone company, you should consult with that company to see whether you can keep your existing phone number.

Your phone company may only ask for a deposit in specific circumstances and there may be alternatives to paying a deposit.

The phone company may ask you for a deposit if you do not have a credit history with the company and you cannot provide satisfactory credit information, you have a poor credit rating with the phone company, or you otherwise pose a high risk of not paying your telephone bill.

The deposit, where required, generally does not exceed the total of three months’ phone charges from the company, including charges for local phone service and any extra services you decide to purchase, such as long distance service and optional local services.

The phone company must inform you of the reasons for asking you to pay a deposit and explain that there may be other options available. For example, you can arrange for someone else, who has a good credit rating with the phone company, to sign a contract with the phone company, agreeing to pay your bill if you don’t. This person is called a guarantor. You can also have someone else pay your bill for you. Another option is to get a letter of credit from a financial institution.

You earn interest on deposits that you have paid to the phone company. The amount of your deposit and the interest you have earned will periodically be shown on your phone bill.

The phone company must periodically review the need to keep your deposit, or the alternatives to the deposit. If the reasons that justified the need for your deposit are no longer present, the phone company must return your deposit, and any interest, to you promptly.

If you cancel your service with your phone company, your deposit plus interest will be returned to you, less any amounts that you still owe.

Your rights when the phone company wants to cut off your phone service

Your phone company can only disconnect your local phone service in specific circumstances and after taking specific steps.

Circumstances when your local phone service cannot be cut off

Under no circumstances can the phone company cut off your local phone service because you have not paid for other phone services, such as long distance, Internet or cellular services.

The phone company cannot cut off your local phone service at one location because you have not paid your bill for a different class of service at another location, such as business phone service. Also, if you are a guarantor who promised to pay someone else’s bill, the phone company cannot cut off your local phone service because you have not paid that person’s bill.

If you are unable to pay the full amount that you owe for your phone services, you have the right to arrange a reasonable payment plan with the phone company. The phone company cannot cut off your local phone service if you are willing to enter into, and honour, a reasonable payment plan. You may also want to consult with your phone company to find out what optional services you can discontinue or block in order to reduce your phone bill (see “Your right to block outgoing long distance and 900 and 976 calls” section).

If you believe that some of the charges in your phone bill are incorrect, you have the right to dispute them. You must let the phone company know that you are disputing the phone bill and pay the part of your phone bill that is unrelated to the disputed charges. The phone company cannot charge you interest or cut off your local phone service because you do not pay the disputed charges, unless it has reasonable grounds to believe that you have disputed the charges as a way to avoid or delay making a payment.

Circumstances when your local phone service can be cut off

The phone company may take steps to cut off your local telephone service only in limited circumstances, such as:

  • when you owe the company more than $50 for your local phone service, including local optional services;
  • when your local phone service charges have been past due for over two months;
  • when you fail to provide or maintain a reasonable deposit or an agreed upon alternative (see “Your rights regarding deposits” section);
  • when you have failed to honour the terms of a payment plan arrangement;
  • when you use, or allow someone else to use, your phone for illegal purposes or to make annoying or offensive calls.

Having your local phone service cut off is a very serious matter. Consult your telephone company’s “Terms of Service” found in your white pages or the CRTC if you would like to clarify when your phone service can and cannot be cut off.

Steps the phone company must take

The phone company cannot cut off your telephone service without providing reasonable advance notice in order to allow you the opportunity to pay outstanding bills, make payment plan arrangements, sort out misunderstandings, or take other actions to prevent your local phone service from being cut off.

The phone company must first contact you and explain why it is planning on cutting off your service. If the reason for ending your service is related to outstanding debt, the phone company must also let you know that you can enter into a reasonable payment plan, what the reconnection charge will be, and the phone number of a company representative you can talk to if you are disputing charges. If the phone company cannot reach you by phone, it must provide this information to you in a written notice to your billing address, or by fax or electronic document.

If the situation has not been resolved, the phone company must provide at least 24 hours’ notice prior to cutting off your service, except in very limited circumstances.

Reconnection of service

The phone company must restore your local phone service when the reason the service was cut off no longer exists. There may be a charge to reconnect your phone service.

If the disconnection of your local phone service was in error or otherwise improper, the phone company must restore your service free of charge. Your phone service will usually be reconnected during business hours on the next working day.

Your rights when you want to discontinue your phone service

You can discontinue your phone service at any time. However, there are conditions associated with ending your phone service. In most circumstances, you will be expected to provide the phone company with reasonable advance notice that you wish to end your phone service.

Before you cancel your phone service, you should be aware of the minimum contract period you have entered into with your phone company. Most customers are subject to a one-month minimum contract period.

If you want to end phone service after the end of your contract period, you will only have to pay the charges incurred up to the date that your service ends, provided that you have given your phone company reasonable advance notice.

If you want to end phone service before the end of your contract period, additional charges may apply.

There are circumstances when the rules regarding ending phone service are different, such as when someone takes over a customer’s phone service, if a customer’s home becomes uninhabitable for reasons beyond the customer’s control, or in the event of a customer’s death. Since these circumstances are very specific, you should consult your phone company or refer to the “Terms of Service” found in your white pages for more information.

Your right to block outgoing long distance and 900 and 976 calls

You can have outgoing long distance calls and 900 and 976 calls blocked. You have the right to have charges for calls to 900 and 976 services waived by the phone company the first time they are reasonably disputed.

Your phone company can set up your phone service so that long distance phone calls cannot be made from your telephone. This long distance blocking service is free, and there is no monthly charge.

Where available, 900 and 976 services are pay-per-call services that connect you to live or pre-recorded information such as chat lines, sports scores, or weather forecasts. You have the right to block outgoing 900 and 976 calls from your telephone. You will not be charged the first time you set up 900 or 976 call blocking service, and no monthly charges apply. There may be a maximum charge of $10 each time you decide to deactivate or reactivate the blocking service thereafter.

Responsibility for 900 and 976 calls

You have the right to reasonably dispute 900 and 976 charges. The phone company will waive these charges from your bill the first time they are reasonably disputed. The phone company may offer to provide you with 900 and 976 blocking service and if you do not accept this service, you will be responsible for paying all future 900 and 976 charges that appear on your bill.

Your additional rights if you are a person with a disability

There are certain services available for persons with disabilities, some of which may be provided at a discount or free of charge.

If you are registered with the phone company as having a disability, you may be able to receive certain services, such as:

  • message relay service available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at no charge;
  • a 50% discount on basic long distance charges for calls within Canada made by a registered user of a Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD); and/or
  • free directory assistance.

A customer who is blind or has a visual impairment has the right to receive billing statements, bill inserts and other billing information in an appropriate alternative format. This could be in Braille, large print, electronic version, or in another format that is agreed upon between the customer and the phone company.

Speak to your phone company to find out about these and other available services and equipment that are specially adapted to meet the needs of persons with disabilities.

Your right to keep your information confidential

Except for your name, address and listed telephone number, all the information that the phone company has about you is confidential.

The phone company may not give out personal information, other than your name, address and listed telephone number, unless you expressly give them permission to do so. There are however a few exceptions to this rule. The phone company may give out your confidential information without your express permission when it has a legal obligation to do so, as well as for very specific purposes associated with your phone service. The specific purposes for which your phone company may give out your confidential information without your express permission are listed in the “Terms of Service” found in your white pages.

You, or a person acting on your behalf, always have the right to access your confidential information. You also have the right to review any phone company records regarding your telephone service. Specific conditions may apply.

Your rights regarding unsolicited telephone calls

There are rules in place to help you reduce the number of unsolicited calls that you receive.

Ways to reduce unsolicited calls

You should be aware that the phone company may make your name, address and listed telephone number available to telephone directory publishers. The telephone directory publisher can, in turn, provide your information to organizations which could lead to unsolicited telephone calls to your home.

In order to reduce unwanted telephone calls, you may subscribe to a non-published number service. This service will remove your name, address and telephone number from the telephone directory and from directory assistance. A charge of no more than $4.45 per month will apply. Alternatively,

Telemarketing rules

Subscribing to a non-published number service or requesting that your information be removed from the lists given out by publishers of telephone directories may not be enough to stop unsolicited telephone calls. Other rules do exist to protect you from unwanted telemarketing received by means of unsolicited:

  • automated calls;
  • live calls; and
  • faxes.

You have the right to complain to your phone company, or the CRTC, if a telemarketer does not comply with any of the following telemarketing rules. The telemarketing rules listed below are under review by the CRTC and may be subject to change. Contact the CRTC directly for up-to-date information on the telemarketing rules.

Automated calls

Automated calls make use of equipment that stores and dials telephone numbers automatically and can include a pre-recorded message that is played when the phone is answered. Automated calls cannot be used for the purpose of solicitation. This includes automated calls made on behalf of a charity, calls requesting that you hold until an operator is available, or calls referring you to a 900 or 976 number. Automated calls are only allowed when there is no attempt to solicit, for example if you are called for public service reasons, for emergency purposes, to collect on an overdue account, or to participate in research. Such calls are only permitted from 9:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on weekdays, 10:30 a.m. to

5:00 p.m. on Saturdays, and noon to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. There are no hour restrictions, however, if the automated call is made for public service reasons.

Automated calls must start with a clear message telling you who is calling, including a mailing address and a local or toll-free telephone number. Automated calls must display the number where the call is coming from or an alternate contact number.

Live calls

When live telemarketers contact you, they must identify the person or organization that they represent. The telemarketer must, if you request it, provide the name, address and telephone number of a person whom you can contact. Telemarketers are required to display the number where the call is coming from or an alternate contact number.

There are no hour restrictions on live telemarketing calls.

If you do not wish a telemarketer to contact you again, you have the right to request that the telemarketer place you on its “Do not call” list. Your name and number must be removed from that telemarketer’s calling list within 30 days of your request. Telemarketers are required to maintain your name on their “Do not call” lists for 3 years.

Faxes

A fax from a telemarketer must identify the person or organization on behalf of whom the fax is sent, including the name, address, telephone number and fax number of a person whom you can contact. The fax must display the number where the call is coming from or an alternate contact If you do not wish to receive a telemarketer’s faxes again, you have the right to request that the telemarketer place you on its “Do not call” list. Your name and number must be removed from that telemarketer’s calling list within 7 days of your request. Telemarketers are required to maintain your name on their “Do not call” lists for 3 years.

Your right to protect your privacy when calling or being called

You can protect your privacy when calling or being called.

Protecting your privacy when making telephone calls

If you don’t want someone you are calling to see your name and telephone number on a call display system, you can make use of call blocking service. The person you are calling will see an empty screen or a message such as “private number”. Call blocking service is provided free of charge when used on a per-call basis, by dialling a specific set of numbers before making the call. Automatic call blocking service on all your outgoing calls may also be available, but monthly charges may apply. Various social service agencies and certain subscribers may be able to receive automatic call blocking free of charge.

Call blocking may not effectively protect your identity when making international calls. For international calls, you may wish to use another method, such as having the operator place the call for you. Some charges may apply.

Protecting your privacy when receiving telephone calls

If you are being harassed by persistent and/or threatening phone calls, and believe that legal measures are necessary, you may use call trace service. Call trace service allows the phone company to provide the caller’s telephone number to the police. You are responsible for informing the police of your situation and your call trace request. Charges may apply for using call trace service, up to a maximum of $10 per month.

Other optional services, such as call display which will allow you to see the name and/or number of the caller, may be available to help you protect your privacy. Contact your phone company, or refer to your telephone directory, to find out more about these services, including any charges that may apply.

Your right to control access to your home

You have the right to control access to your private property.

Your phone company can request permission to enter your premises during reasonable hours in order to perform various services, such as installing, inspecting, repairing or removing its facilities or equipment. Your phone company is required to get permission before it is allowed to enter your home, except in cases of emergency or legal power. The phone company representative must show you a piece of company identification upon request.

Your rights regarding the wiring and equipment inside your home

You have choices when it comes to the telephone equipment and wiring inside your home.

You have the option of purchasing or renting a telephone or other equipment from your phone company. You can also purchase telephone equipment from anyone else that sells such equipment. The telephone equipment must comply with Industry Canada technical specifications.

Most customers are responsible for the telephone wiring inside their homes. If you need telephone wiring inside your home installed, repaired or maintained, you can either hire a contractor or the telephone company to do it, or you can do it yourself. If you live in a rental property, you should speak with your landlord to determine who is responsible for the inside wiring of your residence. If you have multi-line service, or if you are without a telephone jack, the phone company is responsible for the wiring inside your home.

Your right to refunds

You may be entitled to receive refunds when there are problems with your phone service, billing errors, or directory errors.

Refunds for service problems

You have the right to a refund for the period in which you experienced any technical problems with your telephone services, as long as they are not related to your wiring or equipment. To be eligible for a refund, you must inform the phone company of the service problem. In general, you don’t have to ask for a refund if the problem lasts for 24 hours or more. However, to ensure a timely refund, you should specifically request it from your phone company.

Refunds for billing errors

You should inform your phone company if you notice that your telephone bill includes a charge that should not have been billed or that was overbilled. You have the right to receive a refund for any billing error as long as you report it within a set period of time. Billing errors for recurring charges, such as monthly local telephone service, must be disputed within one year, while billing errors for non-recurring charges, such as directory assistance charges, must be disputed within 150 days of the date of the bill. Any refund that you receive for a billing error should also be credited with interest.

Refunds for directory errors

If there is an error in your telephone directory listing or your listing has been omitted, you may be able to receive a refund if you have paid any charges for the listing.

If the error relates to your phone number, you have the right to have your incoming phone calls referred to your correct telephone number free of charge. This service will be provided until an updated directory is made available. Number referral service will also generally be provided if the phone company changes your telephone number for whatever reason, for a limited period of time.

Your right to detailed monthly billing information

You have the right to receive a detailed billing statement every month.

The phone company must provide you with a monthly billing statement which details what local and optional services you subscribe to, and how much you are paying for each service.

The prices for some of the services that you receive may change over time, and the phone company does not necessarily have to notify you before it decides to change them. If you have concerns about an item in your billing statement, contact your phone company or the CRTC.

Your right to register a dispute or complaint

You have the right to dispute charges and to file a complaint about the service you receive. There are processes in place to assist you if you are having difficulties getting service or answers from your phone company.

Disputing phone charges

You have the right to dispute any telephone charges on your billing statement that you believe are incorrect. If you dispute a telephone charge, the phone company will investigate your claims, and will make the results of its investigation available to you. The phone company cannot consider the charges that you are reasonably disputing to be past due, but you are required to pay the undisputed portion of your bill.

As a general rule, the phone company cannot threaten to suspend or cut off your local phone service over any amounts that you are reasonably disputing (see “Your rights when the phone company wants to cut off your phone service” section).

Various scams and frauds exist that may affect your telephone service and could lead to additional charges on your phone bill. You are responsible for keeping yourself informed and protecting yourself against various scams and fraud. For more information about known scams and fraud, contact your phone company.

Complaints

You also have the right to complain to the phone company if you have any problems with the service you receive. If you have a dispute or complaint, the first step is to speak to your phone company. If the representative handling your call cannot resolve the problem to your satisfaction, you can ask to speak to the service manager or a supervisor in the customer service department.

If you are still not satisfied with the answer you are getting, you can contact the CRTC. The CRTC will ask the phone company to respond to your concern shortly thereafter. You should receive the phone company’s response within 20 working days of the CRTC’s request. If the CRTC is not satisfied with the phone company’s response, it may investigate the matter further.

If you wish to register a complaint, or want to find out more about your rights in general, you can contact the CRTC by:

  • Telephone (toll-free): 1-877-249-CRTC (2782)
  • Telephone for TDD users (toll-free): 1-877-909-2782
  • Facsimile: 1-819-994-0218
  • CRTC Internet address: www.crtc.gc.ca
  • Mailing address: CRTC, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N2

Your right to participate in CRTC proceedings

Any interested person or association may participate in CRTC public proceedings, or
may submit comments or concerns to the CRTC.

Any person, or group of persons, can participate in public proceedings held by the CRTC. You can find out about upcoming proceedings through official CRTC announcements which are available from any CRTC office and the CRTC’s website atwww.crtc.gc.ca. The CRTC may also communicate important information through billing inserts in your phone bill. You may contact the CRTC at any local office to find out more information:

Central Office Nova Scotia

Les Terrasses de la Chaudi?re Central Building Metropolitan Place 1 Promenade du Portage 99 Wyse Road Gatineau, Quebec Suite 1410 J8X 4B1 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Tel: 819-997-0313 B3A 4S5 TDD: 819-994-0423 Tel: 902-426-7997

Quebec
205 Viger Avenue West
Suite 504
Montr?al, Quebec
H2Z 1G2
Tel: 514-283-6607
Ontario
55 St. Clair Avenue East
Suite 624
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1M2
Tel: 416-952-9096
Manitoba
275 Portage Avenue
Suite 1810
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3B 2B3
Tel: 204-983-6306
TDD: 204-983-8274
Saskatchewan
Cornwall Professional Building
2125 11th Avenue
Suite 103
Regina, Saskatchewan
S4P 3X3
Tel: 306-780-3422
Alberta
10405 Jasper Avenue
Suite 520
Edmonton, Alberta
T5J 3N4
Tel: 780-495-3224
British Columbia
580 Hornby Street
Suite 530
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6C 3B6
Tel: 604-666-2111
TDD: 604-666-0778

 

* The rights summarized in this guide are for informational purposes only and do not represent a complete list of your rights. The information contained in this guide may also be subject to change. This guide does not change or add to any existing rules or laws. In the event of any inconsistencies between this guide and any existing rule or law, the existing rule or law will prevail.

Accessibility

Our commitment is to improve the accessibility of our products and services because we understand that technology is constantly changing. We regularly interact with the local community to understand the barriers to telecommunications. Tuckersmith Communications Co-operative Inc., and the various associations to which we belong, monitor accessibility services in our industry so that we can be aware of best practices and the improvements.

The charts below outline the accessibility services available to you and may depend on the type of service(s) you choose to have with Tuckersmith Communications Co-operative Inc.

 

AODA Policy and Procedures

All documentation can be made available in alternative formats on request by contacting the General Manger, or through the online AODA feedback form.

TCC is proud to comply with Ontario’s accessibility laws. We received our certification of compliance from the Accessibility Directorate on 11-28-2017.The full compliance report is available upon request.

Video Calling

Allows the user to see and hear the person they're talking to on their mobile phone and lets them see and hear them.

Feature which facilitates use of sign language when used in conjunction with a phone stand.

Call Display

Allows the user to see the caller's name or phone number before they answer.

Provides a visual indication that someone is calling and provides phone number which the user can use to respond in any way they wish.

Messaging

Text messaging (SMS), email, instant messaging (IM) and multimedia messaging (MMS or picture and video messaging) are offered on a large selection of mobile phones and smartphones.

Commonly-used method of communication for people with hearing and speech-related disabilities; does not require use of hearing or speech.

Voicemail to Text

Ability to have voice messages converted into text messages on the user's mobile phone. Supports both English and French.

Turns an unreadable voicemail into text format for people who cannot hear.

Text with 9-1-1

Allows deaf, hard of hearing, or speech impaired persons to communicate with 9-1-1 call centres using wireless text messaging (SMS).

Provides access to 9-1-1 emergency services to customers who are deaf and hard of hearing using text messaging.

Data Only Plans

Where voice services are not required, data-only/internet plans are available for customers with a personal computer, superphone, smartphone or Turbo Stick. Customers can access emails, browse the Internet, and send and receive text messages without subscribing to a voice service.

Ensures that customers who do not use voice services, do not have to pay for voice services.

Self Serve

Allows customer to manage their cellular account on the go using the Web browser on their mobile phone.

Makes it easier for customers to manage their cellular account on their own, and lessens the need to contact customer service.

National Do Not Call List

educes unwanted telemarketing calls.

Reduces unwanted calls from telemarketers.

Enhanced 9-1-1

When the customer dials 9-1-1 from their phone, the call will be routed to the 9-1-1 emergency operator in their area and provides them with location information.

Contact Customer Service

Customer service can be contacted via phone, email, TTY, mail, chat, socials.

Assists customers who use hearing aids to make an informed decision about an accessible phone.

Call Logs

The display of missed or received calls which may have been missed.

Provides customer with the convenience of seeing who called for those who are hearing impaired.

Visual or Vibrating Alerts

Mobile phones can be set to vibrate or give visual alerts to inform the user about incoming calls, emails, messages, calendar appointments and alarms.

Provides customer with the convenience of visual alerts for those who are hearing impaired.

Flexible Plan Options

Wide variety of service plans and features available which can be tailored to suit customer needs.

Gives user the ability to leave a voicemail on a landline phone without the use of voice.

Extended Trial Period [Mobile]

Allows persons with disabilities to have an extended trial period with cellular activation.​​​​​​​

Persons with disabilities: You can return your cell phone within 30 days, without penalty, if you are unhappy with your service. Use up to 100% of your allowed monthly usage during the trial period.

Voice Dialing

Customer can make a call by simply speaking the name or number of the person they are trying to reach.​​​​​​​

Makes dialing a call faster and easier for a user who has a visual disability.

Call Forwarding

Customer can automatically forward incoming calls to any number they choose.​​​​​

Gives a user the ability to forward calls from one phone to another if they wish.

Message Centre

Message Centre is an enhanced voicemail service that takes up to 25 five-minute voice messages.​​​​​​​

Increased capacity for voicemail messages. Could be useful for someone who primarily uses voice calls.

Alternate Formats

Upon request, customers can get bills in Braille, large print, e-text or audio CD format. Some other documents are also available in Braille or large print.

Gives user the ability to receive bills and other documents in a format that is accessible for them.

Enhanced 9-1-1

When the customer dials 9-1-1 from their phone, the call will be routed to the 9-1-1 emergency operator in their area and provides them with location information.​​​​​​​

Automatically provides 9-1-1 call center with customer location information when making a 9-1-1 call.

Contact Customer Service

Customer service can be contacted via phone, email, TTY, mail, chat, socials.

Provides customers with a variety of methods to communicate with customer service in a way that is accessible to them.

Flexible Plan Options

Wide variety of service plans and features available which can be tailored to suit customer needs.​​​​​​​

Provides customers with the flexibility to create a plan that includes features which improve the accessibility of their handset.

Extended Trial Period [Mobile]

Allows persons with disabilities to have an extended trial period with cellular activation.​​​​​​​

Persons with disabilities: You can return your cell phone within 30 days, without penalty, if you are unhappy with your service. Use up to 100% of your allowed monthly usage during the trial period.

Call Display

Allows the user to see the caller's name or phone number before they answer.​​​​​​​

Provides a visual indication that someone is calling and provides phone number which the user can use to respond in any way they wish

Email to Text

Send and receive email via text message

Reduces the need to open multiple messaging applications, thereby reducing the use of hands and/or fingers.

Call Forwarding

Customer can automatically forward incoming calls to any number they choose.

Gives a user the ability to forward calls from one phone to another if they wish.

Visual Voicemail

Customers can manage their voice messages without having to dial in to their voicemail service.​​​​​​​

Faster way to access voicemail, no need to remember password or dial numbers.

Voicemail to Text

Upon request, customers can get bills in Braille, large print, e-text or audio CD format. Some other documents are also available in Braille or large print.​​​​​​​

Gives user the ability to receive bills and other documents in a format that is accessible for them.

Self Serve

Allows customer to manage their cellular account on the go using the Web browser on their mobile phone.​​​​​​​

Makes it easier for customers to manage their cellular account on their own, and lessens the need to contact customer service

Alternate Formats

Upon request, customers can get bills in Braille, large print, e-text or audio CD format. Some other documents are also available in Braille or large print.

Gives user the ability to receive bills and other documents in a format that is accessible for them.

Enhanced 9-1-1

When the customer dials 9-1-1 from their phone, the call will be routed to the 9-1-1 emergency operator in their area and provides them with location information.​​​​​​​

Automatically provides 9-1-1 call center with customer location information when making a 9-1-1 call.

Contact Customer Service

Customer service can be contacted via phone, email, TTY, mail, chat, socials.

Provides customers with the flexibility to create a plan that includes features which improve the accessibility of their handset.

Flexible Plan Options

Wide variety of service plans and features available which can be tailored to suit customer needs.​​​​​​​

Provides customers with the flexibility to create a plan that includes features which improve the accessibility of their handset.

Extended Trial Period [Mobile]

Allows persons with disabilities to have an extended trial period with cellular activation.​​​​​​​

Persons with disabilities: You can return your cell phone within 30 days, without penalty, if you are unhappy with your service. Use up to 100% of your allowed monthly usage during the trial period.

Messaging

Text messaging (SMS), email, instant messaging (IM) and multimedia messaging (MMS or picture and video messaging) are offered on a large selection of mobile phones and smartphones.

Commonly-used method of communication for people with hearing and speech-related disabilities; does not require use of hearing or speech.

Message Centre

Message Centre is an enhanced voicemail service that takes up to 25 five-minute voice messages.​​​​​​​

Increased capacity for voicemail messages. Could be useful for someone who primarily uses voice calls.

Visual Voicemail

Customers can manage their voice messages without having to dial in to their voicemail service.​​​​​​​

Faster way to access voicemail, no need to remember password or dial numbers.

Self Serve

Allows customer to manage their cellular account on the go using the Web browser on their mobile phone.​​​​​​​

Makes it easier for customers to manage their cellular account on their own, and lessens the need to contact customer service.

Alternate Formats

Upon request, customers can get bills in Braille, large print, e-text or audio CD format. Some other documents are also available in Braille or large print.​​​​​​​

Gives user the ability to receive bills and other documents in a format that is accessible for them.

Enhanced 9-1-1

When the customer dials 9-1-1 from their phone, the call will be routed to the 9-1-1 emergency operator in their area and provides them with location information.​​​​​​​

Automatically provides 9-1-1 call center with customer location information when making a 9-1-1 call.

Contact Customer Service

Customer service can be contacted via phone, email, TTY, mail, chat, socials.

Provides customers with the flexibility to create a plan that includes features which improve the accessibility of their handset

Flexible Plan Options

Wide variety of service plans and features available which can be tailored to suit customer needs.​​​​​​​

Provides customers with the flexibility to create a plan that includes features which improve the accessibility of their handset.

Extended Trial Period [Mobile]

Allows persons with disabilities to have an extended trial period with cellular activation.​​​​​​​

Persons with disabilities: You can return your cell phone within 30 days, without penalty, if you are unhappy with your service. Use up to 100% of your allowed monthly usage during the trial period.